Keep calm and carry on?

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It’s difficult not to get angry when someone drives their car into the side of you as they unexpectedly enter your lane without checking their mirrors, or indicating.

It’s difficult not to lose control when someone absent-mindedly steps out into your path, barely missing you, and then has the audacity to tell you to ‘fuck off’ when you ask them to look where they’re going.

It’s difficult not to become exasperated when a teenager who is cycling while on his phone, suddenly pulls out of a side road at high speed without even glancing right, and then shoots you a look that could kill when you advise him to be more careful in future.

Why does it have to be so hard all the time? Why does it have to feel like I’m entering a war zone every time I get out on two wheels? Why does every commute home have to feel like a never-ending struggle, trying to reason with motorists, pedestrians and even other cyclists, who couldn’t care less if you end up in a crumpled heap on the ground, because of their thoughtless actions? Why does it have to feel like everyone is out to get me, all the damn time?

I love riding my bike, but for all the frustration, the fear, the anger and the tears, it leaves me wondering if it’s really worth the mental hardship. It’s hard enough to cope in a world where politics are sending public services down the drain, the media are scaremongering and people become more hostile towards each other every day.

Sometimes I want to ride my bike to escape from it all, but then I find myself wishing I’d not bothered, and that is the most upsetting thing of all.

Square one wobbles, or, test-riding a YoBike

Riding around Bristol now, you can’t help but notice the flashes of yellow. Casually dressed cyclists pass by, sitting upright, Dutch-style, on these distinctive cruiser bikes with 26” solid rubber wheels, high handlebars and ‘join a Cycling Revolution’ printed on their frame signs.

That’s right. YoBikes have come to Bristol.

Naturally I had to have a go, so last weekend while we were in town, we decided to hire a couple to ride home. This was partly because my feet had been torn to shreds by evil flip-flops, and partly so we could be naughty and pick up a Chinese takeaway on the way home. Ssh.

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How YoBike works

Unlike its London counterpart, YoBike doesn’t require bikes to be docked in terminals. You’ll find them spread throughout the city, propped on their kickstands in pre-approved public parking areas.

All you need to do is download their app, create an account and enter your card details. Your first ride is free, and after that it’s £1 for every hour you have the bike.

Simply find an available YoBike, select ‘Unlock bike’ on the app and scan the QR code on its rear lock. You’ll need to have your location settings and Bluetooth switched on. The bike will automatically unlock, and now it’s available to ride. Quick release skewers allow for a swift saddle height adjustment, and then you’re good to go!

Once you’re done, you need to leave the bike at one of the approved public parking spaces, highlighted on the map. If there’s nothing near you, you can park them in a public bike parking area (where there are racks), and send a couple of photos, along with the location details to the YoBike team, so they can add the area to their map. Select ‘End journey’ on the app, and the bike will automatically lock. It’s pretty nifty.

Within the app you’ll find an interactive map of the city, which points out the locations of all available YoBikes, and the areas where you can leave them. Their zone coverage seems to be pretty good as well. We saw bikes left outside the UWE campus near Filton, and we were able to cycle them home to Kingswood, which is about 5 miles from the city centre.

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Square one wobbles

I have to say, I’m not very experienced when it comes to riding many varieties of bikes. Now that I’m so used to being in the racier position that Regina puts me in, returning to an upright position threw me a bit! The handlebars are very wide, and raised really high above the stem, so it has that feel of a Dutch bike (which personally I’m not a fan of, but it will appeal to many).

It’s always like riding a bike for the first time, and I started off quite wobbly! It took me most of the journey to adjust to the upright position and the sensitivity of the steering. I’ve gotten so used to steering with my body, so it was strange to go back to steering with the handlebars. However I can see that this will work really well for people who don’t normally cycle, and will be familiar to those who are used to hiring town bikes in large cities.

The only misgiving I’d raise really, is that they’re not ideal bikes for the hills of Bristol, having just three gears. Riding up the Bristol-Bath Railway Path towards home, it’s only a gentle incline but I found myself working up quite a sweat in the middle gear. I can imagine a lot of people who live in uphill areas, such as Clifton and Redland, may hire these bikes to cycle down into town, but will be unlikely to ride them back up again towards home! This could result in some uneven distribution of bikes, though perhaps the YB team are aware of this and will re-disperse them. I know they’re very quick to respond to misplaced and abandoned bikes, thanks to their in-built GPS trackers, so they’re definitely out on the roads.

Judgement call

The most interesting part of that journey was realising that I felt a bit like an outsider.

It’s not like I felt as though I was the butt of any jokes, but I was very aware that the bikes drew a lot of attention from the more ‘serious’ cyclists, and a few knowing smiles. Lacking a helmet, wearing flip-flops, and being ever so slightly wobbly as I adjusted to the unfamiliar riding position, I can only imagine what I must have looked like.

It’s certainly made me more aware of the judgements we’re very quick to make about other cyclists. After all, while YoBikes certainly will appeal to those wanting to get into cycling without yet investing in their own bike, it also makes for a really convenient way to get somewhere when your other transport plans haven’t panned out.

If the buses aren’t running properly (do they ever run a good service in Bristol?), it’s much cheaper and quicker to jump on a YoBike. You won’t be prepared with a helmet, and you may not have the most practical shoes, but you’re as much a cyclist as the guy in lycra next to you at the lights, smiling with an air of ‘aww, bless’.

It’s a great scheme, and has been a glaring omission from Bristol until now. It’s exactly what’s needed to get would-be cyclists out of their cars and onto two wheels. Long may it continue.

 

 

Women cyclists of Bristol, united

About a month ago, a meeting was called. El gathered a bunch of women cyclists together in the upstairs area of Roll for the Soul, to discuss the lack of community among the women cyclists of Bristol.

We agreed that there are plenty of women cycling in Bristol now, and it was time to create a feeling of cohesion among us. We all brought forth ideas, from putting together women-only day rides, to weekend camping adventures, and drinks socials.

We held our first social on 11th May, and I’m really pleased to say that it was a big success! There was a great turn-out, taking over the downstairs area of RftS, where women mingled, drank beer, ate awesome veggie food and got to know their fellow lady riders.

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Holly McGowan talks about the history of women in Bristol

We paused the chatter to have a group-wide discussion, which gave people the platform to promote their own events and groups, and show everyone what’s already available to get involved in. I’ll list these here.

They’re not all women-only, so lads, you’re allowed to join in too (unless we say otherwise):

Food Cycle

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Photo: foodcyclebristol.wordpress.com
  • Open to all.
  • Food Cycle collect waste food from local businesses by bike, and distribute it to various charities and local ‘skipchens’ for use.
  • They also cook and serve their own community meals across the UK.
  • If you have time during the week (or on a Saturday morning), they’re always looking for volunteers to cycle around the city with a trailer and collect food that’s been pre-agreed with the businesses involved.
  • It’s a lovely way to cycle around the city and give something back to the community.

Family Cycling Centre

Family Cycle Centre
Photo: betterbybike.info
  • Open to all.
  • Based on the site of the former Whitchurch athletics track.
  • They give people of all ages and abilities the chance to ride in a safe, traffic-free environment.
  • They have Bikeability-trained cycle trainers on hand to help, and a large range of bikes to try.
  • They also offer family cycling activities and fun days – perfect if you’re looking for a way to get young children confident on their bikes.
  • They also have plenty of volunteering opportunities.

Group Riding for Women

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Photo: eventbrite.co.uk
  • Women only.
  • Training provided by Heidi Blunden.
  • Hosted at the Family Cycling Centre.
  • This event has now passed, but there’s scope for more in future, so keep your eyes peeled.
  • Heidi provides cycling coaching in Bristol, and this event is aimed at women who want to learn or improve group-riding skills.

Cycle the City Tours

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Photo: cyclethecity.org
  • Open to all.
  • There are a variety of tours on offer, to get you cycling around Bristol and learning more about the city.
  • Around once a month, Holly McGowan does a tour which tells the history of women in Bristol.
  • She gave us a taste of this during this social, and I know for sure that I want to join this tour next time it runs.

Breeze Network

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Photo: news.calderdale.gov.uk
  • Women only.
  • This is actually how I met Heidi, who is also a Breeze Champion.
  • These rides usually run at the weekends, and the distance and pace varies greatly, depending on the ride leader and the type of ride.
  • You can find upcoming rides here.
  • Also, if you’re a confident cyclist and able to ride a minimum of 20 miles, you can find details out how to become a Breeze Champion and encourage more women to ride.

Women’s Night at the Bristol Bike Project

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Photo: thebristolbikeproject.org
  • Women (and trans) only.
  • Monday evenings, 6-9pm.
  • This is a safe space for women and trans people to use the workshop and the tools available to work on their own bikes.
  • Volunteers are on hand to help.
  • We welcome all women to either use the space or come and volunteer, to empower other women to learn how to maintain their own bikes.

Cycling Clubs

Facebook Groups

  • Women only.
  • Two Facebook groups you should be aware of:
  • Women Cyclists of Bristol – Closed group for women cyclists, to discuss anything we wouldn’t talk about in a mixed group (from street harassment to periods). They also have their own Twitter account and email address, where you can get in touch if you need advice or want to share something with other women cyclists in the city.
  • Bristol Biking Bitches – This group is full of women who love to get out on their bikes as much as possible, and frequently post in the group to invite others along for the ride. Full of roadies and MTBers, they’re a great group to be part of if you want to go riding with some company.

I wasn’t taking notes on the night, so naturally I’ve probably forgotten a few things. If there’s anything I should add to this, please let me know.

The next social will be at Roll for the Soul at 7pm, on Thursday 8th June. Hope to see you there!

Bristol Deliveroo Riders Take a Stand

I remember when I first heard of Deliveroo, and thought it would be a great way for cyclists to earn a living doing the thing they love. After all, how often does an opportunity like that come around?

Back then, I wasn’t at all involved in Bristol’s bike community, I didn’t know anyone who worked for Deliveroo, and while I was a cyclist commuter, I didn’t feel that opportunity was for me, so I stuck with my safe office job.

Over the last 6 months or so, I’ve become more involved in Bristol’s cycling community, I’ve met Deliveroo riders on the monthly Critical Mass rides, and I became aware that many of them had started rallying against their employer.

It turns out Deliveroo, despite being a huge company with a great concept, hadn’t quite ironed out their model and processes before rolling it out nationwide. They use their couriers’ self-employed status to get away with paying them less than minimum wage. They’ve also massively neglected health and safety protocols, sending their riders out with five or six trial riders (unpaid) to assess their abilities. Needless to say, that’s impossible on the road.

Not to mention the fact that pay is dependent on the number of drops they make, meaning the faster they cycle, the more they can potentially earn, and therefore the more likely they are to ride dangerously and get into an accident. No one’s pizza is worth your life or limbs.

So it’s great to see that Bristol’s Roo Riders have now taken a stand, raised awareness of their poor working conditions and worked with the IWW to make much needed improvements.

Well done, guys. Let’s spread the word, so that riders in other cities can do the same.