Women’s Night 

Image courtesy of thebristolbikeproject.org

I’ve talked before about how I probably know more than I think I do, but lack the confidence to trust my own judgement. I was also really interested to hear about Lucy’s experience volunteering at Women’s (& Trans) Night at The Bristol Bike Project. Being a trainee in a shop full of experienced mechanics, she found that Women’s Night offered the perfect opportunity to really test her own knowledge, and found that she was able to help those less experienced than her.

So, it was only inevitable that I would experience the same thing, and I’m so happy that I did. I heard that they were struggling to find someone to coordinate the session due to unavailability, and that no one was around to volunteer. There was talk of not running the session. Thankfully we found a coordinator, and I agreed to go along as a volunteer, to be on hand if people needed help.

Side note: Women & Trans Night is an open workshop where members of the public can use the space and the tools to work on their own bike, in a safe environment where they can explore and learn together. A coordinator runs the session, and volunteers are on hand to help out if someone needs a bit of guidance.

Honestly, I was actually terrified. I’d been to Women’s Night before and I knew that it was a nice, laid back atmosphere, but suddenly I felt under pressure to perform. I was actually revising the night before, testing my knowledge, running through common problems and how I would solve them. I even spent about 20 minutes trying to get my head around the difference between a freewheel and a cassette, just in case it came up.

As it happens, I had no reason to fear. I was under the impression that it would just be Gabi and myself, but we ended up inundated with volunteers – confident women who knew exactly what they were doing. If anything, I felt superfluous to requirements for a while. 

But throughout the course of the evening, the workshop filled up with women who had a variety of jobs to do on their bikes, and I had a chance to help out. I showed one woman how to change her tires and talked her through fixing a puncture while out on the road, checked her gears, and explained the difference between the front and rear sets. I then helped another check her chain wear and cassette, gave her some maintenance tips and left her happily cleaning and polishing. At the end of the night I helped another woman out with a rather dodgy V Brake calliper. We finally got it in place, only to discover that her newly inflated tire was completely flat. You win some and you lose some.

Listing it off, it doesn’t sound like I did a huge amount, but I spent some quality time with some very nice people and saw the spark in their eyes as they connected with their bikes. Particularly with the tire changes – the first one was an absolute beast which I really wrestled with, and she was quite nervous about trying the second herself. But a bit of brute force and three tire levers later, she slipped it off and popped the new one on, and she looked so proud as she pumped it up and saw that it was, in fact, put on right.

It was really rewarding, and I can completely understand what Lucy was getting at in her interview. It’s a wonderful feeling to see women who have never considered fixing their own bikes before, suddenly feel empowered to learn as much as they can. 

On a personal level it was satisfying to be able to help others, and realise that I can problem solve and explain some things articulately. I definitely need to work on the latter, but I felt that the women I spoke to left with an understanding rather than feeling confused. 

Considering how panicked I felt the night before, and how much I freaked out the first time I was paired with a less experienced person, I’m proud that I kept my cool and helped some people out. It turns out that showing others does wonders for your confidence, and hopefully with time I’ll be as assertive as the other women who volunteered that night.

I’ll definitely be back to volunteer again. And you know what? I even got to explain the difference between a freewheel and cassette to someone.

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